Working on key areas in our society to improve the lives of everyone.

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Delivering research that has clear public benefit to Government and public bodies with the aim of improving the lives of the people of Wales.

Enabling the research community in Wales, and the UK, through data acquisition, data curation and data protection.

Building capacity and training the research community through education and best practices.

Latest News & Blogs

Future-proofing data research: Putting people at the heart of growth

This blog is by Stephanie Lee, Chief Growth Officer and Co-Director of the ADR Wales training and capacity building programme in Population Data Science at Swansea University. Stephanie shares her…
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Report on analytical leadership cites ADR Wales as an example of collaborating across organisations

A new report from the Office for Statistics Regulation (OSR) cited ADR Wales and the ADR UK partnership as a case study for exemplar use of creating collaborative analytical networks.…
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New Data Explained: Children in Need and Children Receiving Care and Support datasets

This Data Explained summarises experiences and learnings from working with the Children in Need (CIN) and Children Receiving Care and Support (CRCS) datasets. It is intended as a starting point…
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Latest Publications

Journal Article: Using administrative data linkage to drive homelessness policy: Experiences from Wales

This article profiles Administrative Data Research Wales (ADR-W) and its use of data linkage to support homelessness policy and practice in Wales, United Kingdom.

Data Explained: Children in Need and Children Receiving Care and Support, administrative records in Wales

This Data Explained summarises experiences and learnings from working with the Children in Need and Children Receiving Care and Support dataset.

Journal Article: Quantifying the Association Between Family Homelessness and School Absence in Wales, UK

Using administrative data linkage, this paper sought to quantify the impacts of family homelessness on pupil absence from school. It addresses a gap in United Kingdom (UK) homelessness research, which draws predominantly on qualitative methods and where there is a greater focus on people who fall outside of the statutory system, i.e., single people living on the streets, rather than families.